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Game On! Learning

Creating a Culture of Engagement Can Drive Business Results


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1/22/2013
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 Engagement is a hot topic in today’s human resources circles, especially as it relates to our employees.  Intuitively we know that engaged employees are happier and more invested in our business and customers, though it can be challenging to find the right mix of professional and personal development programs that help foster a culture of engagement.  Once we do, how can we measure the value?   Engagement is a hot topic in today’s human resources circles, especially as it relates to our employees.  Intuitively we know that engaged employees are happier and more invested in our business and customers, though it can be challenging to find the right mix of professional and personal development programs that help foster a culture of engagement.  Once we do, how can we measure the value?


As you think about your 2013 talent development initiatives, consider integrating online game-based learning into your program mix.   Our clients have received rave reviews from employees who have taken a Game On! Learning course.  Why?  Much has to do with course design.


Learning is not automatically engaging just because it is “game-based”. Wrapping leaderboards and achievement badges around traditional eLearning or a poorly designed game will not address the engagement challenges we face in our training.   Engagement results from the effective design of the game-based experience using these elements:

  • A story or plot (the premise of the game, and the scenarios within it).
  • Game play used to attain mastery of the enabling and terminal learning objectives.
  • Characters that are realistic enough for the learner to relate to, and learn from.
  • Competition, either between the learner and the game simulator or between a cohort of learners.
  • Recognition and rewards based on achievement levels attained during the game.
  • Increasing levels of complexity to extend skill development and imbed the acquired skills.
  • Challenges that build skill mastery and relevancy to the learner’s job performance.
  • Continual individualized feedback to reinforce correct behavior and remediate incorrect behavior.


Gamelearn®, whose game-based eLearning courses we distribute in the United States, has measured learner engagement levels from over 30,000 students who have taken their game-based online courses. Here is a summary of those measurements

  • Average overall course evaluation: 9.4 out of 10.
  • Percentage who find the course applicable to their job: 98%.
  • Percentage who would recommend the course: 99%.
  • Percentage who complete the course after starting it: 91%.


How can we measure the impact on business resultsTalent Management Magazine recently profiled innovative talent management strategies being implemented by Ernst and Young.  One tool the organization uses is employee surveys to help assess the impact of employee engagement on in its business.

In a recent survey, Ernst and Young found a correlation between its engagement index and employee retention and financial results.  For employee retention, “the turnover percentage varied by 11 percent between the highest- and lowest-performing business units.”  For financial performance, “there was also a difference of tens of thousands of dollars in performance between most engaged and least engaged business units.”

Bottom line: engaged learners are much more likely to bring their “A game” to well-designed game-based eLearning. Its ability to create mindshare and “all in” learners greatly increases the likelihood of a successful performance outcome to the training.

Contact us today by calling (888) 725-GAME and ask one of our Game Changers how our programs can help you build a culture of engagement. Or send an email to info@gameonlearning.com to request more information.


As you think about your 2013 talent development initiatives, consider integrating online game-based learning into your program mix.   Our clients have received rave reviews from employees who have taken a Game On! Learning course.  Why?  Much has to do with course design.

 


Learning is not automatically engaging just because it is “game-based”. Wrapping leaderboards and achievement badges around traditional eLearning or a poorly designed game will not address the engagement challenges we face in our training.   Engagement results from the effective design of the game-based experience using these elements:


·         A story or plot (the premise of the game, and the scenarios within it).

·         Game play used to attain mastery of the enabling and terminal learning objectives.

·         Characters that are realistic enough for the learner to relate to, and learn from.

·         Competition, either between the learner and the game simulator or between a cohort of learners.

·         Recognition and rewards based on achievement levels attained during the game.

·         Increasing levels of complexity to extend skill development and imbed the acquired skills.

·         Challenges that build skill mastery and relevancy to the learner’s job performance.

·         Continual individualized feedback to reinforce correct behavior and remediate incorrect behavior.


Gamelearn®, whose game-based eLearning courses we distribute in the United States, has measured learner engagement levels from over 30,000 students who have taken their game-based online courses. Here is a summary of those measurements

 

·         Average overall course evaluation: 9.4 out of 10.

·         Percentage who find the course applicable to their job: 98%.

·         Percentage who would recommend the course: 99%.

·         Percentage who complete the course after starting it: 91%.


How can we measure the impact on business results?  Talent Management Magazine recently profiled innovative talent management strategies being implemented by Ernst and Young.  One tool the organization uses is employee surveys to help assess the impact of employee engagement on in its business. 

In a recent survey, Ernst and Young found a correlation between its engagement index and employee retention and financial results.  For employee retention, “the turnover percentage varied by 11 percent between the highest- and lowest-performing business units.”  For financial performance, “there was also a difference of tens of thousands of dollars in performance between most engaged and least engaged business units.”

Bottom line: engaged learners are much more likely to bring their “A game” to well-designed game-based eLearning. Its ability to create mindshare and “all in” learners greatly increases the likelihood of a successful performance outcome to the training.

Contact us today by calling (888) 725-GAME and ask one of our Game Changers how our programs can help you build a culture of engagement. Or send an email to info@gameonlearning.com to request more information.
 

 

 

 

 

 



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Bryan Austin
Chief Game Changer at Game On! Learning

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